Tuesday, June 20, 2006

Creating Memories

So, my 9-yo daughter (the Artist) sets her alarm to the local "Mix" rock station, and listens to it as she falls asleep. Last night, as I gave her a good night visit, the song "Melt With You" was playing.

What did I remember? The fun times I had in school? Certain friends from "back in the day"? How Reagan was "destroying" the country? (Don't you know, all good libs remember how Republican politicians were killing their idealist fantasies.)

No. I was remembering a few weeks back, watching and listening to the Artist and her 4-yo brother (the Engineer) dance around the living room, singing "I'll stop the world and melt with you...let's stop the world."

Now, in the car, they sing other songs that I practice for my band, making up their own words where they believe they fit.

Watching your kids have fun...priceless.

4 comments:

Favorite Apron said...

In the brains of children, that song makes neurons change their configuration to a pattern of hyperactivity. Even adults do bouncing up and down/ 80s-style dancing when they hear it, necessitating chiropractic appointments. My advice -- find a new song.
And don't do what my dad did. He once broke his toe by stubbing it while imitating ballet dancing for us.

Quipper said...

Then you'd really enjoy watching them sing "Take Me Out" by Franz Ferdinand, and watching the Engineer sing the chorus to "Let's Get It Started"...Hah!

I believe in hyperactive music...it's what I used to settle myself down and do my best studying in college. (My wife fondly remembers how I would have Metallica blaring through my walkman as I studied for exams.)

At least I don't mosh. Never have, never will.

Marie N. said...

Your wife "foldly remembers"? or is that "incredulously recalls"?

Mrs. Quipper

Quipper said...

Dearest Apron Girl,

To test your theory, at least with a song I had available at the time, I turned on "Take Me Out" for the Engineer. He simply spun in circles (he didn't run in circles), sang the words he knew, and changed the ones he wanted to change.

You say neuron changes? I say 4 yr old boy. :-)